Herb of The Month - Horseradish

Author: Alyce Cimino   Date Posted:1 October 2017 

Horseradish is often found on the condiment tray, waiting to accompany a burger or steak at the Sunday barbeque; however this spice packs more than just a flavour punch. Cinnamon

Horseradish grows under the ground, similar to a carrot! It also has a nice nutritional profile, rich in essential minerals and even Vitamin C! As always, fresh is always best for nutrient content, and if you are going to enjoy the pre-minced spice, be mindful of the ingredient list and little additives such as sugar and dairy which are often used to reduce the intensity horseradish can bring.

Energetically, horseradish is unique. It has spicy and warming properties which in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) are believed to nourish the lung, spleen and large intestine meridian channels. Its strong warmth helps to open orifices in the body and expel congestion – this is most commonly seen in the sinus area. You may have experienced the feeling when eating horseradish; you can feel the warmth spread through the sinus area and open up the airways. 

In Western Herbal Medicine horseradish is commonly used to help relieve the symptoms of hayfever, mucous congestion, respiratory catarrh and nasal congestion.

Horseradish’s warming properties are not limited just to the sinus area. It also has a role on warming the digestive system. Horseradish has the ability to stimulate our salivary response and digestive enzymes which may enhance the how we breakdown and absorb the nutrients we consume. The strong warming properties may also support to improve circulation around the body.

While this powerful spice has some wonderful properties, it is best used in moderation as too much can be a little too stimulating and cause digestive upset. If using the fresh spice, be mindful to keep it away from eyes and wash of skin to avoid irritation.

 

 

Add horseradish to your pantry and try these little tips!

  •  Use fresh and add into salad dressings for an extra punch
  •  Make your own sinus relieving tea; horseradish, lemon and manuka honey
  •  Add into recipes
  •  Create your own paste and ready to use condiment
  •  Use with sushi rather than wasabi
  •  Create a power packed hummus or guacamole

 

Written by Alyce Cimino

Alyce Cimino (BHSc Naturopathy) is a qualified Naturopath with a passion for nutrition, food as medicine and helping others achieve their health goals towards a happy and healthy lifestyle. Alyce believes health begins with delicious whole foods and in her spare time you can find her in the kitchen creating something deliciously healthy or at the beach enjoying the sunshine and ocean.

Alyce has a love for herbal teas, but all teas are better with a little raw cheesecake on the side.


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