Essential foods for bone and joint health

Author: Emily Seddon   Date Posted:9 September 2016 

An A-Z for bones and joints

We all know a regular intake of vitamins and minerals are good for our long term health, but which of them specifically help our bones and joints?

It’s generally a safe bet that eating a wide range of fruits and vegetables, proteins and good fats will be beneficial to your health. However, it’s good to be aware of foods that may help you in specific ways.

  Why? Where do I find it?
Bioflavonoids Reduces inflammation and pain within joints. Citrus
Pineapple
Berries
Boron Trace mineral essential for bone density. Dried fruit
Nuts, seeds
Avocado
Calcium Necessary for bone strength. Dairy
Dark leafy greens
 
Copper Trace mineral essential for bone density. Squid
Cashews
Chocolate
Peas and beans
EPA Omega-3 fatty acid which reduces inflammation and pain. Fatty fish
Seeds and nuts
Olive oil
Magnesium Involved in bone mineralization.
Deficiency presents with joint pain and damage.
Dark leafy greens
Nuts, seeds
Dark chocolate
Manganese Involved in building blocks of cartilage and bone tissue. Seeds, nuts, grains
Fish
 
Phosphorous Necessary for bone strength. Grains, seeds, pulses
Vitamin C Necessary for the formation of joint-protecting collagen. Fresh fruit and veg
Citrus
Kiwi fruit
Broccoli
Vitamin D3 Necessary for calcium absorption. Egg yolks
Vitamin K2 Necessary for calcium retention in the bones. Meat + poultry
Cheese + butter
Natto (fermented soy)
Eggs
Zinc Trace mineral essential for bone density.
Antioxidant helpful in protecting against damage to joints.
Oysters
Wild rice
Mushrooms

 

It’s also useful to know what may be detrimental to your joints and bones too. Try to avoid consuming large amounts of:

  • Alcohol.
  • Soft drinks.
  • Artificial sweeteners.
  • Excessive salt intake.
  • MSG.
  • Processed foods.
  • Refined sugar.
  • Refined carbohydrates.
  • Trans fats.

These can increase inflammation, as well as interfere with the absorption of beneficial nutrients from foods. It’s best to steer clear or keep these to a minimum wherever possible.

Written by Emily Seddon
Emily Seddon

Emily (BHSc Naturopathy) is a qualified naturopath with a love of science. Growing up with a hippy mum and dad, Emily grew used to thinking outside the box for her own health. She has since completed a degree in Health Science, majoring in Naturopathy, combining that passion for healthy living with scientific and traditional evidence to help others to live happy and healthy lives.

She loves using herbal and nutritional medicine to treat ailments and lives by the philosophy of “there is no such thing as too much tea.


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